Browse Items (345 total)

MostHolyTrinityConvent.jpg
A front view of the first convent used by the Sisters in the Most Holy Trinity parish. When the Sisters arrived in 1953, the convent was not quite ready, so they boarded with the Sisters of the Good Shepherd for a few weeks. By the mid 1960s, the Sisters moved into a larger two-story convent.

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c1960FirstConventA.jpg
An image of the first convent used by the Sisters in the Most Holy Trinity Parish. The convent was two one-story three-bedroom prefabricated houses connected together. It was built this way so that after the Sisters moved to a larger convent, the units could be separated and sold to a family in the area.

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c1950ChurchExteriorClassroomInRear.jpg
A side view of the old church at 55th and Lamar. As the community in the parish continued to grow, Sisters needed increasing room. One place they found for classroom space was in the back of the church.

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1953MigrantWorkersHomes.jpg
A view of a migrant worker's house on the perimeter of the Our Lady of Perpetual Help parish boundaries. Sisters both in the OLPH and Most Holy Trinity in Phoenix would teach the children of the migrants.

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OLPHChurchBeforeFire.jpg
An interior view of the church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help at 55th and Lamar. The image is believed to be before a possible fire burned a significant amount and it had to be renovated.

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OLPHChurchFront.jpg
An image of the front of the church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help at 55th and Lamar Ave. in Glendale, AZ. The parish of OLPH was the first location in Arizona that the Sisters settled in. When the Sisters arrived in the summer of 1950, they quickly realized that wearing their black habits was absolutely inappropriate for the Southwestern weather. They borrowed material from the Precious Blood Community to make Arizona-specific habits, which included a grey tunic and white veil.

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Parlor.jpg
The Social Hall was used by the students as a space for indoor recreation.

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c1943StudentsHorses.jpg
Seven students sitting on horses on the campus grounds. Horse riding was a popular pastime for the students. Sister Helen recalled that most days from 3-4, students spent time outside for athletic purposes. One of the general regulations stated that athletic exercises were required unless a pupil presented a doctor's note.

c1940SchoolBus.jpg
An image of the school bus used to transport day schoolers to and from the Academy. There was an option to board at the school, which four students did the first year the school opened in 1937, but most students lived at home.

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c1940LowerSchoolStudents.jpg
Students from the lower grades outside of the school house. When the school opened, Sisters held classes from 1st through the fourth year of high school. All grades were taught French and there was an emphasis on musical classes.

Bedroom.jpg
A dorm room used by one of the lodgers at the Academy. Sister Marie Sylvia, mistress of boarders in the 1930s, described how difficult it was to keep the boarders from being bored because there was little excitement at the Academy. Students wanted to go to movies and into town, but were seldom allowed, unless there was a lay teacher willing to accompany them.

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LogCabin.jpg
An image of what is likely the gymnasium used by the students at Notre Dame Academy in Southern Pines. A booklet about the school advertised the various athletic opportunities for students to enjoy, including: tennis, basketball, hockey, volleyball, archery, horseback riding, swimming, and boating.

Grounds.jpg
A view of the grounds at Southern Pines. Previously known as "Pineholm", the estate that the Sisters bought included two garages, four barns, wind mills, a log-cabin gymnasium, two lakes, pine groves, and a sunken garden.

Convent.jpg
The front entrance to the convent in Southern Pines. In 1935, Sister Provincial Rosalia of the Blessed Sacrament was initially looking for a rest house for sick or invalid Sisters. A doctor recommended the restorative climate of North Carolina. While Sister Rosalia of the Blessed Sacrament was in North Carolina, accompanied by Bishop Hafey of the Diocese of Raleigh, the idea of a school replaced that of finding a rest house. When she purchased the land in Southern Pines, it was with the intention of establishing an academy.

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1937NDAcademyBuildingFront.jpg
A view of the front entrance to the academy, which was originally a barn. The Sisters taught children from primary grades up through high school.

_1937NDAcademyBeforeConversion.jpg
An image of the school building before it was converted by the Sisters for educational purposes. The building was originally a barn and was part of a 258 acre estate.

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c1950GraduationProcession.jpg
A procession of students for their graduation ceremony at Notre Dame High School in Hamilton. By 1950, there were 233 students enrolled at the school.

c1888SistersA.jpg
A photo of the Sisters and novitiates in the Hamilton community around 1888. By 1888, the Sisters taught at St Joseph's, St Stephen's, the Notre Dame Day School or Academy, and St Mary's.

c1880AcademyDaySchoolStudents.jpg
A photo of early students, around 1890, at Notre Dame Academy in Hamilton. Although initially concerned about the low enrollment at the Academy, the Sisters soon saw increasing numbers and by 1901 would need an additional building.

1929SrSuperiorIgnatiusLoyolaField.jpg
An image of Sister Superior Ignatius Loyola in the school yard at Notre Dame High School in Hamilton. Sister Ignatius Loyola was Superior in Hamilton from 1928-1934.
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